Author Topic: A novel breathalyzer records blood glucose levels in diabetes sufferers  (Read 1920 times)

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Offline finny

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A researcher has designed a new noninvasive breathalyzer equipment that he states that can observe blood glucose levels in diabetics. This is with respect to analysis provided at the 2013 American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists (AAPS) Once-a-year Meeting and Exposition.

With respect to the American Diabetes Association, 25.8 million individuals in the US experience from diabetes - a illness that prevents the natural usage of sugar in the blood and frequently requires regular blood glucose tracking.

Present technology to evaluate glucose in the blood contains the use of a convenient testing meter. This is an digital device that can evaluate sugar levels in the human body from a small drop of blood.

But Ronnie Priefer, of Western New England University, Springfield, MA, states that that this technology is unpleasant, can often trigger pain for the individual, and can cause to low conformity - significance there may be bad health results.

Therefore, he searched to make a new non-invasive technology with equal effectiveness.

The hand-held breathalyzer was designed using nanometer-thick films that are created of 2 polymers.

These polymers are capable to respond with acetone. Acetone is one of the ketones - acids that stay in the body when the body burns up its own fat. Ketones develop up when there is not sufficient blood insulin to assist fuel the body's cells, meaning they are more general in individuals with diabetes.

In the breathalyzer equipment, the acetone connects to the polymers and alters the physical chemistry of the film. The film then shows the amount of acetone identified, which in turn shows glucose levels in the blood.

Commenting on the strong points of the device, Priefer states that:

"Breathalyzers are a increasing area of research due to the fact of their prospective to have a important beneficial effect on patients' high quality of life and conformity with diabetes tracking. What makes our technology different is that it only accounts for acetone and does not respond with other components in the breath."

At present, the breathalyzer is a similar size to a book, but Priefer states that that an engineer at Western New England University, Dr. Michael Rust, is assisting to make the device a identical size to breathalyzers that are applied to detect blood alcohol content levels.

Priefer notes that common deficits with other breathalyzer technology have involved unreliable outcomes due to natural moisture in the breath, high temperature specifications and lack of difference.

But he says that delayed next year and early 2015 will see the device being control examined by two clinics from Western New England University. These assessments will evaluate readings from the breathalyzer with finger pricking and real glucose levels from drawn blood.

He adds that he programs for the breathalyzer to be examined by sufferers in an uncontrolled setting in 2 years.

A novel breathalyzer 'screens blood glucose' in diabetes patients

Offline Rodrigo01

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Yes breath analyzer is helpful for diabetes sufferers. Analyzers can identify breath's compounds concentrations and have good sensitivity.Breath analyzer is available on amazon 

Offline EvanBurchett

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Diabetes affects many people worldwide. It is considered as an autoimmune disease which prevents the natural cellular sugar’s uptake from the blood and typically requires frequent blood-glucose monitoring. There are lots of medical instruments like the blood glucose meter etc. out there in the market, which are used to monitor blood glucose level. They are considered as invasive, thus scientist now invented a novel noninvasive breathalyzer device based on multilayer nanotechnology, which measures blood sugar level from small drop of blood.